About Sharayah Bower
Sharayah Bower is a Kutztown University alumni with a Master's degree in English. She has focused closely on African American and Indigenous feminine texts and plans to pursue a PhD program where she can further her studying, knowledge, and awareness about these cultures and their contemporary issues (especially those regarding gender and rape culture). In the near future, she intends to teach English and Composition by focusing closely on narrative writing as an attempt to more effectively educate others about--and counter--rape culture. She also enjoys tutoring others with their writing because it has only helped to improve her own.

Women’s Marches Persist!

February 2, 2018 0

I often find myself reminiscing about (and reflecting on) the women’s marches that took place last year.  Being in D.C. alongside my closest friends was truly an unforgettable experience! Never in my life have I […]

A Snowflake’s Lament

January 12, 2018 1

Has every generation that preceded mine felt as attacked and betrayed by their government as I’m feeling now? I’m sure in many ways they have…when they were forced to go to war. When their country […]

Still Angry, Still Feminist

December 5, 2017 1

I’d like to share about a recurring issue in my life called being a woman. I’m finding myself–due to recent events involving a beloved professor from my alma mater being chastised by Fox News clown, […]

You Are Not Alone When You Stand Up To Hate

August 31, 2017 0

A few weekends back, Jaron (the significant other), Bernie (the fur baby-puppy), and I attended a vigil held on behalf of Heather Heyer and all those who have been hurt or killed while standing up […]

Polluting the City with Misogyny

May 23, 2017 2

Photo credit Sharayah Bower     So much has changed in Philadelphia since living here in 2011. There are more buildings, more shops, more eye-catching murals, more trees, more dog parks, and (thankfully) more bike […]

Adjusting to New Political Surroundings

March 22, 2017 0

Moving is an oddly cleansing experience. I donated many things I didn’t need to those that do. I left behind my ties to—and familiarities with—my hometown. And best of all, I made myself uncomfortable again. […]

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